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My Life Entertainment Launched “I’m The Light” by ML Underwood, a Stirring Track Aimed at Black Community

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My Life Entertainment LLC presented”I’m The Light” by ML Underwood, an eclectic hip-hop artist, songwriter, and a successful millionaire, on July 3rd, 2020.Underwood’s “I’m The Light” is the perfect fusion of hip-hop culture and the glorious heritage of black people to empower and motivate the community to follow the light and find success in their lives.

ML Underwood is the voice of the young African-Americangeneration, but address the black community throughout the world. His music is a force: as a combination of knowledge, emotions and melody, Underwood goes beyond just the conventional hip-hop to empower the black people and serve as a light to give hope at the times when everything seems to be dark. This new work of art is a stunning hip-hop success, leading the black people to follow the right direction that leads to success.

Underwood is a successful millionaire who decided to give back to his community and his people by inspiring them to change their current state through music. From a purely musical point of view, I’m The Light is probably the catchiest song on the album. Lyrically, it is a reference to the light to success that black people need to follow. As with all Underwood songs, you have to listen to the lyrics and hear them several times to catch the essence of it, as it always contains the message that hits you like an epiphany. That’s a must. If you want to understand what worries young blacks and what the centuries-old struggle against oppression means to them, you have to hear ML Underwood.

During the American Revolution, many African Americans fought in the rebel army. They actively collaborated in the achievement of the independence and birth of the United States. It was a decisive factor for the abolitionist movement to gain momentum and, over the years, it ended up eradicating slavery in some northern states; In contrast, the southern states, commercially focused on the cotton market and highly dependent on slaves for optimal profits, continued to demand slaves at will. They did not consider abolishing their inhumane exploitation.

As a poet and hip-hop artist, ML Underwood occupies a special place in the African-American music that covers their glorious history. Here he questions the deep meaning of the great “revolutionary” impetus, which is shaking America in the light of the entertainment society, which is redistributing the cards. Prophetic in his questioning of the capacity of the media and mainstream culture to lull people to sleep, his phrasing will make him above all one of the precursors of Hip-hop, even if the rappers will not always recognize themselves in his uncompromising faith in “vintage” revolution.

This conscious version of the I’m The Light, a funky apology for gangster culture which will also serve as a basis for Rap, will nevertheless deeply mark all those who want to question the publicity recovery of struggles and the hidden fascination for the spectacular system.

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